Tagged: simple

Bang On Design

It’s always exciting when someone creates a new packaging or product innovation that changes the face of that category entirely and potentially sets the future of it. One such example is the ‘Dissolve’ prototype toothbrush packaging by Atelier Bang Bang, a Montreal based screen printing workshop and multidisciplinary design studio. It was designed by the company’s founder Simon Laliberté for the ‘Remarkable Packaging & Alternative’ category of the 2012 Packaging Exhibition in Paris where it won 3rd place.

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The innovation of the packaging stems from the want to make it 100% recyclable, resulting in a pack that completely dissolves within ten seconds when exposed to water. This is achieved through the use of cellulose based paper and water-soluble soy inks. The design of the packaging itself is relatively simple as the dissolving nature of it means it doesn’t have to be incredibly fancy. Instead, it’s quite stripped back, using just black and white, with the word ‘dissolve’ written across the faces of the slightly futuristic and more complex triangular packaging shape. It’s a really interesting and clever concept that completely revolutionises the toothbrush market and definitely succeeds in its recyclable aims. I believe that it’s this truly revolutionary nature that could allow it to work well in practice if ever taken from prototype to mass production.

Here it is in action;

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Film The Blanks

Movie posters nowadays are often saturated with cheesy close-ups of actors or over the top action stills. They are thought of much more as simply commercial marketing rather than pieces of design. However they used to be just as iconic and memorable as the films they promoted, as seen in posters for films like Jurassic Park and Vertigo. So iconic in fact, that designer John Taylor has tested our ability to remember and recognise these images through an experiment he calls Film The Blanks.

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By distilling the posters down to their core elements of colours and shapes and taking out anything that would easily identify the films, Taylor has created a series of images that are immediately recognisable as the iconic movie posters they were originally. It’s really interesting how our brains can easily and quickly identify the film, just from a few colours and shapes. It really shows just how iconic these movie posters were, both as promotion for the films, but also as great pieces of design.

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The entire collection of abstracted posters can be found here.

Found via Fast Co. Design

G . F Smith Gets An Update

Paper company G . F Smith were recently rebranded by design studio Made Thought with a new identity and brand mark to better reflect the company’s past, present and future. I quite liked their more zany previous logo and identity, however, being a big fan of Made Thought’s work, I was immediately intrigued in what they would do with it.

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The new identity is simple and structured, using the dot of the i to separate the G and F. It is clean and crisp, letting the paper be the focal point and hero of the story, just as it should be with a well respected paper company like G . F Smith. It also brings the company’s history to the forefront through the new ‘1885 Onwards’ tagline. Made Thought also created a secondary brandmark to use as a watermark-like ‘seal of quality’ that brings a human touch and links to the company’s predominately handmade approach to their craft.

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My favourite part of the rebrand though, is the company’s new business cards. The design makes use of G . F Smith’s extensive range of paper types and colours to again make the paper the hero of the piece. The text on them is kept simple and structured like the new identity, giving space for the paper to be fully appreciated, but still allowing for all the necessary information to be bold and clear.

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The new branding and identity were also rolled out across the G . F Smith website.

All in all, it’s a really nicely thought out body of design by Made Thought. It gives G . F Smith a clear and memorable identity that befits the history and future focus of a 130 year old company. It’ll be really interesting to see what Made Thought creates for G . F Smith in the future or any future work they do for other clients as I am a big fan of their work. I’ll definitely be looking to send them my portfolio very soon, as I come to the end of third year at Uni.

Found via It’s Nice That

Eyebombing 2 – Even Googlyer

Whilst I was writing the last blog post, I came across a couple more examples of “eyebombing” and thought I would use a quick post today to show you them.

First is the work of ich bin KONG who used small polystyrene balls to bring his chosen objects to life. A few of my favourites are below and there are more on his website here.

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Street artist D*Face turned his attention to discarded christmas trees for his work. His “eyebaubles” project turned the trees into humorous figures that have a wide range of expressions, from depressed to angry to confused.

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Found via Design Taxi

Olhos Dão Vida (Eyes Give Life)

To promote corneal donation in an effort to reduce the number of corneal problems in Latin America, Sao Paulo-based creative agency F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi created a great new campaign.

Created for the Pan American Association of Eye Banks, it shows just how something as simple as a pair of eyes can give inanimate objects life.

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This use of googly eyes to transform inanimate objects is not a new idea. In fact, its part of a wider street art movement called “eyebombing” which was started by two Danish street artists. Their goal was to humanise the streets and the movement has attracted a huge following since its inception.

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You can see more “eyebombing” photos on the movement’s Flickr page and website, where you can also purchase an “eyebombing” starter kit to help you spread it further.

Found via Design Taxi

Specsavers Gets Topical Again

Some of you might remember a post I did last year during the Olympics that featured a great piece of topical advertising by Specsavers based on the North Korea/South Korea flag balls-up of the games. It was a great piece of work that was well received due to its relevance at the time.

Well now, half a year later, they’ve done it again. This time drawing influence from the infamous Eden Hazard ball boy kicking incident from the football this week. A simply designed advert that is sure to be popular and raise a chuckle!

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Mighty Rice

I suppose it’s a bit ironic that the day after I post about not having the time to post as often anymore, I find the time to write this! Now I’m not going to spontaneously start singing about “rain on your wedding day” or “a free ride when your already late” or anything else from that ridiculous Alanis Morissette song. What I am going to show you is some great packaging.

I know that Sundays are usually reserved for Music & Photo posts, but before you all start commenting saying “Sam, where’s my weekly dose of music and photos!?”, I decided not to do that today as yesterdays post had photography in it. Rest assured that Music & Photo Sunday will be back soon.

 

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